kayshapero: (Default)
It started when I looked up DNA base pairs since for some reason one of the names had slipped my memory (for the record, Adenine - Thymine, Cytosine - Guanine [or Uracil with some RNA]) and found this Wikipedia article.  Now look down the page to "Unnatural Base Pair" to see what got my attention...  Yeppers, if you work at it you can find other bases that you can fit into the double helix.  In fact if you'll look near the end of that section, someone actually inserted some into a strain of E Coli and lo and behold, they have remained in the organism's genome for a number of generations.  Don't CODE for anything, but still impressive.  An article in Popular Mechanics of all things: New Organisms With Synthetic DNA Could Lead to Entirely New Life Forms

Down in the further reading section, you find among other references, these two which cost $$$ to read, but all you really need to see are the abstracts which are free.  Yeppers, if this works out you get nano power cables for nano constructions....


Clever, Guido H.; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko (2012). "Chapter 10. Alternative DNA Base-Pairing through Metal Coordination". Interplay between Metal Ions and Nucleic Acids. pp. 269–294.

Megger, Dominik A.; Megger, Nicole; Mueller, Jens (2012). "Chapter 11. Metal-Mediated Base Pairs in Nucleic Acids with Purine and Pyrimidine-Derived Neucleosides". Interplay between Metal Ions and Nucleic Acids. pp. 295–317.
kayshapero: Lynx looking thoughtful (Lynx)
Thank you, Science Daily!

DNA 'cage' could improve nanopore technology
Date:February 10, 2015
Source:Brown University
Summary:
Researchers have designed a tiny cage that can trap a single strand of DNA after it has been pulled through a nanopore. While caged, biochemical experiments can be performed on the strand, which can then be zipped back through the nanopore. The device could enable researchers to probe DNA before and after a reaction takes place.

Despite having a diameter tens of thousands of times smaller than a human hair, nanopores could be the next big thing in DNA sequencing. By zipping DNA molecules through these tiny holes, scientists hope to one day read off genetic sequences in the blink of an eye.

Now, researchers from Brown University have taken the potential of nanopore technology one step further. They have combined a nanopore with a tiny cage capable of trapping and holding a single DNA strand after it has been pulled through the pore. While caged, biochemical experiments can be performed on the strand, which can then be zipped back through the nanopore to look at how the strand has changed.
(more)


Hmm... People have been talking about DNA as a data storage medium (I mean other than the things it stores now), this certainly could help.

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